Guinness: a nice, interesting drink for nice, interesting women, 1977-79

In 1977-78, grappling with falling sales and quality problems, Guinness commissioned yet another marketing strategy in the hope of turning things around. One idea was to appeal to young women.

We’ve just finished scanning and cataloguing the collection of Guinness material we wrote about a few times last year. These marketing strategy documents (there are several) are full of fascinating details, not least in the annotations in pencil by (we assumed from context) Alan Coxon, the head brewer at Park Royal to whom these documents belonged.

Here’s what the 1977-78 document says under ‘Strategy & Objectives – Women’:

i) To recruit to more regular drinking the younger female drinker who identifies with the assurance, maturity and independence associated with Guinness for women.

ii) To reduce defection from Guinness by reinforcing the loyalty of existing frequent and less frequent users.

The second group were likely to be ‘older and poorer’, the kind of people who’d traditionally drunk Guinness, but the other group were a new target:

[Younger], socially active and better off. Guinness may already be a part of their drinking repertoire, though remote. These are likely to be C1 C2 women aged 25 to 44.

Here, though, Alan Coxon had some thoughts of his own, neatly marked in the margin:

I just do not believe in the possibility of this. It is not a young woman’s drink, surely. If we get it right it will have the wrong image for young women & surely we cannot expect them to like it!!

The proposed creative approach for appealing to young women was interesting, too, based on ‘the correct blending of four key elements’:

i) The user-image of a self-assured woman who is independent, sociable and healthy; equally at ease in both a man’s and woman’s world.

ii) The product as a unique, attractive, long drink, natural and enjoyable.

iii) The mood as one of relaxed and sociable enjoyment.

iv) The quality and style of the advertising as attractive, credible and contemporary (rather than fashionable or trendy).

The brand position reached as a result of this creative approach should be:

“Guinness is the drink for the self-assured woman.”

Finally, there were suggestions on how to reach women. With television reserved for male-orientated adverts, the idea was to place ads targeting women in magazines – ‘their personal medium’.

How did all this go? Fortunately, we have some handy follow-up information, from the next year’s marketing plan, covering 1978-79. It suggests that double-page spreads did run in women’s magazines (we’d love to track some of these down) and that they were felt to be successful enough to continue with.

An amusing punchline, though, is a restatement of the marketing objective:

The primary task of the advertising is to change attitudes about the kind of woman who drinks Guinness: to oversimplify, ‘Guinness is a nice, interesting drink which is drunk by nice, interesting women.’

UPDATE 08/03/2019: Jon Urch, who works for Guinness, sent us a copy of one of the ads, which we’ve now added as the main image above.

4 thoughts on “Guinness: a nice, interesting drink for nice, interesting women, 1977-79”

  1. A source for the double page advertising spreads might be The History Advertising Trust which is an archive of historic advertising based in rural Norfolk – website http://www.hatads.org.uk. You can request research from them on enquiries@hatads.org.uk or their address is:
    History of Advertising Trust, 12 Ravenham Centre, Ravenham, Norfolk, NR14 6NU; tel: 01508 548623.

    Part of their archive is complete bound sets of the Sunday Times and Observer colour supplements which really take you back into a past golden age of drink marketing

  2. I’m old enough to remember those ads: they were in the more “sophisticated” (in a 1970s sense) women’s magazines, such as She (whatever happened to She? Close in 2011, according to Wikipedia), rather than the knit-your-own-royal-family ones, and they featured sophisticated young women drinking bottled guinness in, IIRC, Wellington half-pint glasses. I recall lengthy copy designed to push how well Guinness-drinking went with the modern She reader’s lifestyle … (Why was I reading it? It was my mother’s favourite magazine, and it actually had a high standard of writing: Nancy Spain, for example.)

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