Weltenburger Kloster

weltenburger_bottle.jpgFantastic news, which I somehow missed last month: Weltenburger Kloster beer now has a distributor in the UK, according the Tom Cannavan over at Beer Pages.

Weltenburger’s beers were some of the most consistently interesting and excellent we tasted on our recent trip to Bavaria. The Asam Bock really is as good as Tom says, although I was even more excited at the typo on the menu which suggested a double bock with tea (“Assam Bock”). A future brewing experiment…?

The Barock Dunkel, too, is very different to many other German dark beers, and really seems to earn the “dark” title.

A German Beer Trail: New York Times

The cathedral in Cologne, home of KoelschThe New York Times travel section has a fantastic piece on German beer culture. German beer is fantastic – almost invariably – but it can be frustrating to go to cities hundreds of miles apart and find that the menus have the same four styles: helles, pils, dunkel and wheat beer. Where have all the local speciality styles gone, asks Evan Rail?

“It happened very quickly,” said Ron Pattinson, whose European Beer Guide lists many obsolete and rare German beers, including broyhan from Hannover, mumme from Braunschweig and keut from Münster. “The older styles were overwhelmed, and what we’ve got left are just the odd remnants of beers. It’s like a landscape that has been swamped, and you can just make out the odd tree and hilltop.”

Rail hunts down the remnants of local German beer styles, including Leipzig’s Gose:

The Gose was amazing, with a mild taste of salt immediately noticeable in its thick, mousse-like head. Its body was light and slightly spicy followed by a remarkably bright finish, more crisp than the most crisp riesling, sharper than the sharpest Chablis, and a better match for tricky citrus and vinaigrette than any wine I’d ever encountered.

Now that’s what I call writing.

A German Beer Trail: Searching for Local Brews – Travel – New York Times

Keeping a head on your pint – here comes the science

Scientists have carried out research into how a pint keeps (or loses) its head (BBC News Online). One of the scientists involves speculates that the long-lasting creamy head on Guinness might be the result of “a little surfactant“. Eugh.

Ochsenfurter Kauzen

The article also asserts that “the foam on a pint of lager quickly disappears”. Well, perhaps on a pint of Fosters in a dirty glass, but the head on a glass of lager in Germany sticks around for quite some time. And they’re not using “surfactant” – the sinister and secretive arbiters of the German Beer Purity Law wouldn’t stand for it.