News, nuggets and longreads 4 May 2019: ramen, gin, kveik

Here’s all the beer-related gubbins that caught our eye and seemed bookmarkworthy in the past week, from ramen amateurs to the perceived sophistication of gin.

First, though, some bits of news on the health and tra­jec­to­ry of spe­cif­ic brew­eries, which we expect to be includ­ing in these round-ups quite a bit in the com­ing months.

North­ern Monk, which was one of the brew­eries we’d heard might be on the verge of takeover, has announced that Active Part­ners has tak­en a less than 25% stake in the com­pa­ny. (We’re begin­ning to learn the code: that prob­a­bly means some­thing like a 24.5% stake.) In their announce­ment, they acknowl­edge hav­ing bat­ted away offers from larg­er brew­eries.

Mean­while, in Lon­don, Red­church seems to be under­go­ing some tur­moil. It has appar­ent­ly filed notice of inten­tion to appoint an admin­is­tra­tor with the civ­il courts, and changed own­er­ship. (Is it us, or is the launch of crowd­fund­ing increas­ing­ly reli­able as an indi­ca­tor that a brew­ery is either going to fold, or get sold?)

Con­tin­ue read­ing “News, nuggets and lon­greads 4 May 2019: ramen, gin, kveik”

Guinness: a nice, interesting drink for nice, interesting women, 1977–79

In 1977–78, grappling with falling sales and quality problems, Guinness commissioned yet another marketing strategy in the hope of turning things around. One idea was to appeal to young women.

We’ve just fin­ished scan­ning and cat­a­logu­ing the col­lec­tion of Guin­ness mate­r­i­al we wrote about a few times last year. These mar­ket­ing strat­e­gy doc­u­ments (there are sev­er­al) are full of fas­ci­nat­ing details, not least in the anno­ta­tions in pen­cil by (we assumed from con­text) Alan Cox­on, the head brew­er at Park Roy­al to whom these doc­u­ments belonged.

Here’s what the 1977–78 doc­u­ment says under ‘Strat­e­gy & Objec­tives – Women’:

i) To recruit to more reg­u­lar drink­ing the younger female drinker who iden­ti­fies with the assur­ance, matu­ri­ty and inde­pen­dence asso­ci­at­ed with Guin­ness for women.

ii) To reduce defec­tion from Guin­ness by rein­forc­ing the loy­al­ty of exist­ing fre­quent and less fre­quent users.

The sec­ond group were like­ly to be ‘old­er and poor­er’, the kind of peo­ple who’d tra­di­tion­al­ly drunk Guin­ness, but the oth­er group were a new tar­get:

[Younger], social­ly active and bet­ter off. Guin­ness may already be a part of their drink­ing reper­toire, though remote. These are like­ly to be C1 C2 women aged 25 to 44.

Here, though, Alan Cox­on had some thoughts of his own, neat­ly marked in the mar­gin:

I just do not believe in the pos­si­bil­i­ty of this. It is not a young woman’s drink, sure­ly. If we get it right it will have the wrong image for young women & sure­ly we can­not expect them to like it!!

The pro­posed cre­ative approach for appeal­ing to young women was inter­est­ing, too, based on ‘the cor­rect blend­ing of four key ele­ments’:

i) The user-image of a self-assured woman who is inde­pen­dent, socia­ble and healthy; equal­ly at ease in both a man’s and woman’s world.

ii) The prod­uct as a unique, attrac­tive, long drink, nat­ur­al and enjoy­able.

iii) The mood as one of relaxed and socia­ble enjoy­ment.

iv) The qual­i­ty and style of the adver­tis­ing as attrac­tive, cred­i­ble and con­tem­po­rary (rather than fash­ion­able or trendy).

The brand posi­tion reached as a result of this cre­ative approach should be:

Guin­ness is the drink for the self-assured woman.”

Final­ly, there were sug­ges­tions on how to reach women. With tele­vi­sion reserved for male-ori­en­tat­ed adverts, the idea was to place ads tar­get­ing women in mag­a­zines – ‘their per­son­al medi­um’.

How did all this go? For­tu­nate­ly, we have some handy fol­low-up infor­ma­tion, from the next year’s mar­ket­ing plan, cov­er­ing 1978–79. It sug­gests that dou­ble-page spreads did run in women’s mag­a­zines (we’d love to track some of these down) and that they were felt to be suc­cess­ful enough to con­tin­ue with.

An amus­ing punch­line, though, is a restate­ment of the mar­ket­ing objec­tive:

The pri­ma­ry task of the adver­tis­ing is to change atti­tudes about the kind of woman who drinks Guin­ness: to over­sim­pli­fy, ‘Guin­ness is a nice, inter­est­ing drink which is drunk by nice, inter­est­ing women.’

UPDATE 08/03/2019: Jon Urch, who works for Guin­ness, sent us a copy of one of the ads, which we’ve now added as the main image above.

More pink beer for the ladies?

Kasteel Cru beer in its little pretend champagne bottle
Kas­teel Cru beer in its lit­tle pre­tend cham­pagne bot­tle

Mar­ket­ing mag­a­zine brings news this week of a new pink ver­sion of Kas­teel Cru, aimed at women. They’re call­ing it a ‘rose’. Where does the idea that women will only drink pink beer come from…? Gulpen­er seem to have the same idea, too.

Kas­teel Cru is a quite pleas­ant if unex­cit­ing lager made with cham­pagne yeast, so already aimed square­ly at peo­ple who don’t like big pints of ale.

Still, bet­ter than putting brown food colour­ing in wine to make blokes drink it, eh?